Skip to main content

Stop Napping and Start Living

It's been so long since I've written anything that I'm kind of having a hard time doing it now. But, as a good friend just told me, I should probably write something...after all, I have about a month's worth of college to write about now.

I've never been someone who's good with transitions...or being away from home for very long...or meeting new people...or trying new things...so, I've had an eventful few weeks. But, while these last few weeks have been a little nerve-wracking and scary, it's helped me appreciate the little things: a good cup of coffee,  a call to a family member, macaroni, a good book or movie, a quiet moment, time spent outside, naps, etc. 

But, as the same friend just told me (she's pretty smart...), I need to quit napping and start living (I am paraphrasing. She said something much wiser that I should have written down at the time). The fact that I don't know anybody and my attitude can change at the drop of a hat. I just have to change them. I had to do the same thing in high school, and the memories of that transition are powering me through this one right now. It's easy to get up, to sleep during the day,  or to stay in my room and watch a movie, but it's smart to speak up, to get involved, and to appreciate both the opportunity I have to start over and the people who've stuck with me through all my ups and downs and are still here now. 

While I have plenty of hours a week to learn inside the classroom, but I have plenty more to learn about myself and others in the outside world. After all, that's part of college (or so I'm told. I'm not an expert. I've only been here a month, after all). So, I start today to expand my comfort zone, to stop napping and start living, to make the decisions that will lead me to the right people and make me a better person. After all, I have plenty of transitions ahead of me.

Enjoy the song. Thunder Clatter by Wild Cub

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Film List Project #2: MASH

Did you know MASH was a movie before it was a TV show? I didn't. Maybe that's a well-known fact. Maybe I'm very out of the loop. Anyway, I watched MASH this week. I'm just discovering Robert Altman, the director of the film. He made a movie in 1975 called Nashville , which I sort of felt obligated to watch since that's my hometown. I loved the film, especially because it had so many interesting characters mashed together. MASH  charmed me for the same reason. I've never been one for war films (this is set during the Korean War), but I was fascinated by the band of arrogant, witty surgeons in the film. It really didn't feel like a war film, to be honest. It felt like the Korean War was just where they happened to be. That feeling makes sense when you realize that these men and women are just trying to feel that way themselves. I don't have any personal experience with war, but I have read a few books about the subject, fiction and nonfiction, and

Worry

We've all got problems. We don't have good grades, our car broke down, we don't have enough friends on Facebook or Twitter or blog followers, we ate too much, we're starving, we don't know when our favorite TV show comes back on, we're missing a party or a big game for something really boring, our job sucks, etc. No matter how trivial these problems seem to other people (or your future self looking back on where you are now), they are tough and matter to us. They are real problems. That is, until something real happens. Something worthy of at least three episodes on a major TV show. A lot of times when something like this happens, we are in shock, not even able to comprehend what has just happened. Then, we have to go through our day, scared and numb. But finally, you get that moment when you can calm down. That may mean you have to clean, make a mess, scream in a pillow, talk to yourself, pray, talk to your neighbor's cat, read, write, watch your favorite

Cameron Crowe Ruined My Life

Believe me when I say that it pained me to type out the title to this post. Cameron Crowe is one of my very favorite filmmakers. To me, a guy who can write teenagers who are real people, really capture the full spectrum of human emotion, and incorporate a great soundtrack into his work is a real genius. Though it initially made me feel warm, fuzzy, and hopeful, a recent late night viewing of 2005's Elizabethtown  ended up making me a little nervous. I realized that Crowe was just like everybody else. Now, this probably doesn't make sense to those of you who admire his work. As a writer and filmmaker, Crowe definitely has a unique voice and vision that helps his work connect with all kinds of audiences. That's precisely the problem. Last week I wrote a post about how movies are only a reflection of life and not actually true to life itself. In the post, I mentioned that filmmakers are just one person with one perspective, and that is absolutely true of Crowe. In Crow