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On the Oscars

I really don't know how to start this post off, mostly because it's sort of impossible to type out a shrill squeal. In all honesty, I can't really do that now anyway because of all the squealing I did last night over my favorite night of the year.

Oscar night has always been sort of sacred to me. However, what started out as a shameless night of celebrity worship has grown into a celebration of all the people who have inspired me with their work and dedication. Last night, everything melted away as I watched, tweeted over 70 times (!), and customized what was possibly the greatest pizza ever.

Anybody who watched also witnessed history. If you don't agree, think about this: We still talk about that one Cher outfit. You know the one. You're picturing it right now. I'm pretty sure that's all I need to say.

Even though there will be countless shallow "10 Best Moments" lists on Buzzfeed, arguments over "Best Dressed", and discussions of the "Pizza Oscars" today, there were some really inspiring moments last night.

 Jordan Catalano, ahem, Jared Leto, thanking his mother and acknowledging everything else going on in the world was the perfect way to start things.

Cate Blanchett exclaiming that female-driven projects make money will definitely have people talking, and may even change people's attitudes. Okay, that may be overly optimistic, but you have to give her huge props for getting up and speaking the truth in such a committed way.

Matthew McConaughey's speech should just be required viewing. Period. Anyone who knows me knows how skeptical I've been of him in the past, but now, I'd say he's pretty alright, alright, alright.

Frozen winning Best Animated Feature wasn't just a victory for Disney, but for Jennifer Lee, who, in sticking to her vision became Disney's first female director and a pioneering writer-director in the animation industry.

Amy Adams, Meryl Streep, and Lupita Nyong'o getting up and dancing with park ranger Pharrell Williams was just so cool. Celebrities! They're just like us!

Ellen DeGeneres killing it, making what often feels like a stiff event a really fun piece of television. (She and about twenty others also broke Twitter)

"Pizza fixes everything"- Jennifer Lawrence interviewed by Barbara Walters
"God!"-Jennifer Lawrence upon recieving pizza at the 86th Annual Academy Awards

Idina Menzel, or, as John Travolta called her, Adele Dazeem, giving an incredible performance, despite having her performance time cut and her name butchered.

And finally, Lupita Nyong'o winning for her first job out of school and telling everyone that their dreams matter will forever be etched in my brain. That girl worked long and hard to achieve what she's achieved, and she's using her new fame to do good and dress fabulously.

These moments really sum up what I love about the Oscars as a whole. Beneath the gowns and the jewels and the spectacle, they're this beautiful celebration of what people can do. The movies and the people involved tell stories in a way nothing else can. Every single element that goes into a movie requires thought and planning, even though most people don't actively acknowledge sound editing or production design. The Oscars make people aware of how hard each and every one of these incredible people have worked. We get to witness these people's dreams come true, and I think anyone with a dream can relate.

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