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Why You Should Pick Gilmore Girls As Your Next Binge Watch

I was binge watching Gilmore Girls before I knew what binge watching was. A popular cable channel would air episodes every Monday-Thursday, and 12-year-old me would tape them to watch on Saturday morning. I fell in love with the show, watching it in its entirety at least twice (the show is 154 episodes long, so that's no small feat). I'll even go as far to say that it was my introduction to television, and I love television. So when I heard the cult show was going to start streaming on Netflix, I thought I'd do my part to get the rest of the world to binge watch it, too. Here are my top 3 reasons why you should:

1. Who are these people?
This show has some of the most interesting and lovable characters I've ever seen. Lorelai and Rory Gilmore are bizarre, charming, and witty from the get go, and prove to be women to admire. Both are incredibly intelligent, ambitious, and determined. Rory works hard to go to the best schools she can, and her mother works hard in her career to support. The mother-daughter relationship between the two is like no other. They seem more like best friends or sisters than a mother and her daughter, and sometimes that causes problems in their relationship, but boy, is it fun to watch. Lorelai and Rory were the first characters I saw on TV to make mistakes and work to fix them. They're a sharp change of pace from the "fix the problems in one episode with a lecture and a smile" type you see in comedy on TV. They were human. The cast of characters around them are even better, with even the most minor characters having uniquely odd personalities and back stories.

2. So you wanna learn about pop culture?
Boy, does this show have pop culture references. I mean, if you know anything about this show, that's what you know. So many shows after it have tried to mimic the fast-talking wit of the people of Stars Hollow, but it can't be done. The reason the references work is because Lorelai and Rory are weird. They sit in on weekends and watch movies and TV you've never heard of, all while eating 3 pizzas, 2 take out boxes of lo-mein, and an industrial-sized bag of chocolate without gaining a pound. There were so many references in this show that the DVD box set of the complete series (which I'm a proud owner of. Thanks, Grammy and Pops!) came with an alphabetized encyclopedia of every person, TV show, song, movie, book, and obscure figure that was ever mentioned. You wanna learn something? Learn from these girls.

3. The Gilmores: They know drama
You want a show about a dysfunctional family? Try this one. How about a misfit girl trying to make it in a private school? Here you go. You like relationship drama? Boy, are you in luck. This show is a well-rounded bundle of drama for sure. You don't believe me? Go watch the show.

I could go on and on about why any person would find binge-watching bliss in my favorite show, but I'm going to spare you. After all, if you know me in real life, you've probably heard enough sentences that start with "This one time on Gilmore Girls..."

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