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The Film List Project #6: Airplane!

I've always found that the best way to relieve the stress that is the mountainous work load during pre-Thanksgiving weeks is to watch a funny movie. With that in mind, I opened up the list this week, and it popped out at me: Airplane!

I'm so glad this movie was what I watched this week, not only because I laughed for the first time since I heard the words "due Friday",  but also because this is one of those movies that has been constantly referenced in my house since I was a kid.

The biggest testament to the movie's influence on my family comes in the form of a dog. A few years ago, in an attempt to explain our rambunctious golden retriever Mac's behavior toward strangers, my mom took to YouTube. What she wanted to show us was this scene:

I think every family has a few movies that are interwoven into the their lives. Lines are quoted involuntarily, scenes are acted out at the dinner table, etc. To me, that is the best evidence to film's influence on our culture. 

I'm glad this movie is a part of my family's fabric. The movie's humor is clever and just plain wrong. To be honest, Airplane! probably couldn't be released today because of all the offensive material. As someone who grew up in a world that's so self-conscious about being PC, I found myself laughing at the offensive jokes, taking a moment to feel guilty, and then going back to laughing. 

As someone who has tried to write comedy and failed miserably,  I'm so envious of whoever came up with a scene that ends in the line, "Get me Ham on five, hold the Mayo". Anybody who thinks comedy isn't an art form needs to watch this movie and try to come up with one liners like the ones in Airplane!

Honestly, I don't think I'll ever be able to experience air travel again without being disappointed by a lack of this kind of hilarity and an instinct to avoid the fish.

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