Skip to main content

The Film List Project #20: Bring It On

Ready? Okay!

After a few weeks of writing about some particularly heavy movies, I decided to pick a title off the teen movie section of the list. When I realized that Bring It On was still on the list, I was a little appalled. After all, is it really a day in America if Bring It On hasn't played somewhere on cable?

Even though this movie was released in 2000, I consider it an honorary member of the typical '90s teen movie family. Why? Here are just a few of the reasons:

1. One of the decade's most popular blonde actresses in a lead role (Kirsten Dunst)

2. One of the decade's most popular brunette actresses in the edgy, alternative sidekick role (Eliza Dushku)

3. A guy named Jesse with Prince Eric eyebrows playing the book wearing, punk listening, sensitive love interest who says things like, "I made you a tape" (Jesse Bradford)

4. Not-so-subtle product placement (Hey there, Diet Coke!)

5. Not-so-subtle references to now irrelevant pop culture figures (Hey there, Nancy Kerrigan and Sugar Ray!)

I could go on and on. A lot of these '90s movies only live on because of the former teenagers who saw them in theatres, but this one is undoubtedly a classic.

In my opinion, this is because Bring It On succeeds where others have failed in one thing: the film actually tackles some pretty big issues.

The film discusses issues of race, sexuality, and, above all, the way women and girls treat each other. All throughout the film, when another girl on the squad makes a decision someone doesn't agree with or takes a position of leadership, she is automatically labeled a "slut", "bitch", "hag", etc.

My question (and the question of so many other people) is why? Why is it that women can't engage i debate or discussion? Why must we use these horrendous, disrespectful labels and attack each other instead of actually communicating?

I think Bring It On challenges that female behavior in a really effective way. It captures the audience with a great, funny story and characters you can root for while questioning how people, specifically girls who are supposed to be working together, behave.

So here's my message: watch this movie. Laugh, root for the characters, and be entertained. After you watch the movie, reflect on why in the past you've used those words to describe somebody. Was it really necessary? Could you have used some better, more intelligent words? Did calling someone that accomplish anything? Even if you don't see the movie, instead of labelling someone, actively try to communicate your ideas the next time you disagree with someone or don't understand their point of view.

And, above all, don't forget your spirit fingers.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

I'm Still Not Sure

I've tried to start this post several times over the past few weeks. For one thing, it's incredibly difficult to write after not doing so for months (seven, to be exact). It's another thing entirely to admit that I don't know what I'm doing, where I'm going, or who I am.

That being said, I've done it before. Two years ago, I posted a video on YouTube entitled "I'm Not Sure". Now, if you've never seen this before, I completely understand. I just watched it for the first time since I posted it, and it was cringeworthy. This is not only because it's weird to watch 20 year old me go through her YouTube phase, touch her face too much, talk with some strange inflection in her voice. Well, that's certainly part of it. Really, though, it's because nothing's changed.

At the end of the video, I say I'm grateful that I have a year and a half left of college to "figure it all out". That year and a half has passed. I gradu…

Am I Too Old for This?

When I turned 22 in August, I made the joke that I was scared to go into a Forever 21 for fear of setting off the age limit alarms. It was a bad joke. Still is.

In truth, there are a lot of things I should have outgrown: Disney movies, old cartoons, comic books, procrastination. That's not the end of the list, but those were the only things I could think of off the top of my head. One of the things I never thought would be on the list, though, was teen movies.

As I sat in the theater watching The Edge of Seventeen (fantastic movie, by the way), I realized I was five years older than the protagonist. Granted, that's not a huge age difference, but it was enough to make me realize I'm in a different place in my life than the characters in the movie for the first time in a while.

Teen movies are and have always been one of my very favorite things. I grew up wanting to be like the older characters in teen movies, then relating to the characters when I aged into their stories, a…

Talking to Myself in the Mirror

I think it's a pretty safe bet that a lot of aspiring actors/writers/directors/filmy people practice their future Oscar speech in the mirror as kids. I did. Who am I kidding? I still do. It comes with the territory. My mirror talks go, ahem, went (who am I kidding? go) further.

Sometimes, I do my makeup while talking to Barbara Walters. Other days, brushing my hair turns into a podcast interview. Most of the time, though, I rehearse what I'm going to say to my heroes. These hypothetical moments are incredibly important, and I can't afford to say anything stupid, so car rides, showers, and mornings getting ready are devoted to preparation.

This probably makes me sound crazy. The word "narcissist" may also come to mind. I think one of my heroes would have appreciated both the crazy and the narcissism in this bit of oversharing, though, but we lost her this morning.

One of my first posts on this blog was a tribute to Carrie Fisher. I read it over this afternoon after…